All The Things You Need To Know About Restraining Orders

When your spouse has become a violent and dangerous person to be with, you need to protect yourself at all cost. When you are constantly threatened, abused, harassed, or stalked, a restraining order may be your best defense against your abusive spouse. According to the website of Marshall & Taylor PLLC, it may be in your best interest to file for a restraining order.

In general, a restraining order is a court order protecting you from further harm by someone who has hurt you. It is designed to keep the abuser away from you or keep them away from the scene of abuse which could either be your home, workplace, or apartment. It is a civil order and does not give the abusive person a criminal record.

Victims of domestic violence can get a restraining order. A spouse, a former household member, and another person who is present at home and who is more than 18 years old and an emancipated minor can file a restraining order. Victims of any age who has been subjected to domestic violence by the person who will be the father or mother of the child when the pregnancy comes full term can also obtain a restraining order.

The restraining order lays down the things that the abuser can and cannot do. For example, the court may order them not to have contact with the victim personally or though the phone, at home, work, or almost anywhere the victim requests to put in the order. It may also provide protection for other members of the victim’s family.

The initial serving of the court order is called temporary restraining order or TRO. In most states, the TRO is valid for more than 10 days. At the expiration of the order, the abuser and the victim will be asked to appear in court. If the abuser violates the court order, they may face arrest by the police. Just make sure you carry the TRO all the time.